The Compliance Word

S1E3: Women In Compliance: Rashada Timkee

March 24, 2021 RAW Compliance Season 1 Episode 3
The Compliance Word
S1E3: Women In Compliance: Rashada Timkee
Chapters
0:00
Intro
2:17
Rashada's Career
9:44
How Rashada Got Into Sanctions
12:19
Sanctions
15:02
Regulatory Compliance
17:10
Emotional Intelligence Of A Compliance Officer
24:15
Mentors & Mentees
30:36
Kindness Vs Niceness
39:00
Where Does Rashada She Herself In The Next Five Years?
42:07
Compliance Culture
45:09
Approachability, Collaboration and Empowerment
49:01
Outro
The Compliance Word
S1E3: Women In Compliance: Rashada Timkee
Mar 24, 2021 Season 1 Episode 3
RAW Compliance

Rashada Timkee is a senior compliance professional who currently works at Citibank. Oonagh and Rashada talk in-depth about compliance culture, sanctions, and the importance of the relationship between a mentor and a mentee. Hosted by Oonagh Van Den Berg and edited by Luke McCann.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Rashada Timkee is a senior compliance professional who currently works at Citibank. Oonagh and Rashada talk in-depth about compliance culture, sanctions, and the importance of the relationship between a mentor and a mentee. Hosted by Oonagh Van Den Berg and edited by Luke McCann.

Intro:

Welcome to the RAW compliance podcast. Each week on the compliance word host Oonagh van den Berg will meet with practitioners from across the industry, public, private, and FinTech reg tech providers. They will honestly and rawly discussed topics impacting risk mitigation in financial services, financial crime, and how we can build sustainable and credible compliance culture. Our aim is to empower listeners with the knowledge and skills to tackle these problems and promote positive change to the global compliance community. And now, your host Oonagh van den Berg.

Oonagh van den Berg:

In today's the compliance word podcast, we are going to be speaking with Rashada Timkee. Rashada is a senior compliance professional currently working at Citibank. Thank you, Rashada for joining us today. Such a pleasure to get you on our podcast today. I came across your profile on LinkedIn, and I was incredibly inspired by the positivity of the messages that you put out. There are not many people that capture my attention on LinkedIn. But when I saw your posts, and I saw how authentic they were, I said I need to speak with this lady. I need to learn more about you, especially what got you into compliance. I know that you have obviously worked in multiple organizations. Citibank now and previously JPMorgan. I want to know, how you ended up getting into compliance? Your messages on LinkedIn really are resonating. I want to learn more about kind of what inspires you put those messages out there.

Rashada Timkee:

Thank you so much. I really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you and delve into my background and the things that I am passionate about within compliance. I honestly had no prior knowledge of what a compliance professional looked like. I got a BA in finance. Around the time I graduated, we were just rebounding from the recession. If I could land a role within finance, I was not picky about where, the job market was not the best. I think that me being recruited prior to graduation was for me, like whatever you want me to do, I will take it. I was recruited within a Management Associate Program. I started my career with Regions Bank, and it was a two month of high-level overview at their headquarters in Birmingham, Alabama. It essentially was getting us grown for the professional environment. Getting us better acquainted with the inner workings of a finance institution. And honestly, etiquette, professional etiquette. Once we completed those two months, I came back to my market, which was within the Tampa Bay area. I started working from the ground up, which is one thing that I really appreciate it from the role. I had to work as a Head Teller, financial service specialist, and then finally as assistant branch manager. That really allowed me get a feel for the frontline and all the different aspects within the retail space. I was within the retail space for five years before I decided that sales wasn't really my thing. I wanted it to pivot to a different career. Initially, I thought that would be HR. But everything happens for a reason. That did not work out. When I started to really think about my transferable skills, I really started to think about the fraud prevention that was required when you are onboarding clients. Even when you are noticing trends that seem a bit out of place with existing clients. My branch, just due to the location near two interstates had a lot of fraudulent activity. So that allowed me to develop my enhanced due diligence, the KYC piece, and I was able to leverage that experience to transition into a compliance role. My first compliance role at JPMorgan.

Oonagh van den Berg:

Incredible that you ended up going into these roles by accident. Like yourself I started in around 2003. It was back in 2001, when I graduated with my undergrad. I did not know what I was going to do. I knew I wanted to work in law, but I did not want to be a barrister or solicitor. My mother said to me, before you make any big decisions take a year to work around various kind of solicitor offices, barristers, chambers and the courts, just to kind of get a feel for what it is. I very quickly felt that this was not for me at but I still loved regulation. I applied for a role as a personal trainer because I love fitness. I used to swim and run back in Ireland. I was like, maybe that is my thing. Then this master's program offer popped up. It appeared the same day, as I got the job offer for personal training role. I was like is this is this fate. I went off to participate in the master program. I remember my first month in the role, my grandmother had called me to say you have got an envelope. It was a paycheck from the job at this bank, Santander which had never taken. For some reason, they thought I was on the payroll and had sent my first month's salary. I think that was my first moment of kind of real ethics. I sent it back. Compliance was not a role you saw at a job fair. It was something that I found by accident when I was at JPMorgan in London. I just remember there was this guy. He works in the regulations, my favorite area. He also gets to go to the pub at lunchtime, and then he is drunk for the rest of the day. I thought to myself this is like the best job ever. I was in my early 20s, I thought I could own this job. I obviously found out very quickly that compliance involves a lot more than just going to the pub at lunchtime. It is amazing how you fall into it. When you look at compliance from the outset, you see compliance, you do not necessarily understand all the derivatives within it. Especially when you get into the big banks like Citi and JP. It is massive and so diverse. My question to you is, you started out thinking you're going into retail, and then you thought you were going into human resources, and then you kind of ended up in compliance. How did you end up in your area? You are in sanctions, and financial crime. How did you end up in that transition? Because it is a big jump!

Rashada Timkee:

To be quite honest with you. I think the one thing that aided my transition into the sanction space was that at the time, organization were trying out a 'follow the sun' transaction screening model. They wanted to have real time transaction screening, and not to have that lag whenever Nam had to go home for the afternoon. Essentially, they were hiring for a third shift, an overnight shift. There were about six of us on the team, all brand new. We were working anywhere from 10pm to 7am. My shift was have that lag whenever Nam had to go home for the afternoon. Essentially, they were hiring for a third shift, an overnight shift. There were about six of us on the team, all brand new. We were working anywhere from 10pm to 7am. My shift was 12am to 9am. I do think that because they realize that it would be kind of slim pickings, when it came to the talent that was interested in working an overnight shift. They were willing to be more open minded about the relevant experience. That is how I ended up in sanctions. I remember being interviewed and the director being concerned because I was used to that client engagement. He said, you're going to be staring at a screen for eight hours a day. But I was sure I could do this. If the work is intriguing enough, I will be fine. Luckily for me, I had a genuine interest in something that I had never even heard of before. It was nowhere on my radar. The way it was ever evolving and the way that it kept you on your toes just aligned with my interest. My natural curiosity. That is how I ended up in the sanction space.

Oonagh van den Berg:

Sanctions is a very technical area. Especially over the past four. It evolves day in day out. One of the most challenging situations before was the 2008 crash. Where overnight, we were having to manually implement restrictions for short selling and that's from the markets perspective. It is comparable to the last four years of sanctions. We need to double check every day to assess what is happening. It was all evolving. It became to a point where you had to be on top of your game, considering there was a lot of mental pressure. Citi has great systems in this regard. What did you do to prepare yourself for such an evolving and moving landscape when you are working day to day?

Rashada Timkee:

Prior to working in sanctions, I cannot say that I was really interested in international news. I think just due to the things that I would review day to day, that landscape obviously was attracted to me. I really became interested in the political piece of it. Just having a pulse on administration. I think that would help you forecast as much as possible, but it was very unpredictable. I think if you kept a pulse on things you were able to kind of forecast to an extent, what may be coming down the pipeline. Our professionals and our talent at the firm, were really great at taking error on the side of caution. Reading the tea leaves and being able to prepare us for things that would come down the pipeline. With that, we weren't caught off guard. At the end of the day, there will be developments that occur that we just must be prepared to respond to. I think that spoke to the competency of our team.

Oonagh van den Berg:

Different banks have different structures. Being familiar with the city, I know that the sanctions fall under compliance remit as opposed to the financial crime remit. It's kind of separate. You have transitioned from sanctions now into compliance risk management, which is the more regulatory side of things, as opposed to the financial crime and AML. Your background, especially with your retail experience lend themselves very well to that movement. Moving from sanctions into regulatory compliance, as opposed to moving into financial crime compliance, what was the persuading factor?

Rashada Timkee:

I think the persuading factor for me was being aware that it would be a whole new challenge. Of course, I want to be able to transition into a role where I know that Im able to leverage relevant and transferable skills, but at the same time, I want it to be able to stretch myself. I wanted to be able to go into a role that would force me to level up and expand my knowledge base. I think this role was just that. On the risk management side, becoming more familiar with different governance; the GRC, risk categories this was something that I wasn't familiar with. Now I'm essentially within the escalations realm. I have a lot more exposure to the organization as opposed to specialized field, which is how it was within sanction. I think just the potential to learn and grow and widen my knowledge base is what really attracted me to the role.

Oonagh van den Berg:

When you talk about throwing yourself in the deep end. That is exactly how I've lived my career. I love a challenge. I hate it when I become complacent in my role, because I'm not learning and I'm not growing and not developing. I have had the privilege of working across all areas of compliance. I have built control rooms, I have been doing fixed income advisory, I've redesigned GRC frameworks for private banks. What I love so much about our job is that every single day is different. You can make a list for tomorrow and say, 'here's the 10 things I need to do tomorrow. If you get one of those things on your list done, it is a good day. I would not say it is firefighting, it's just there are constant challenges. I love that no two issues are ever the same. Everything comes with its own nuance. Everything comes with its own set of factors and typologies that you really need to think about it. Obviously, the regulatory environment is evolving as well. I just loved when you said, it forced you to level up! You are literally speaking my language. I loved one of your recent LinkedIn posted where you said, One of the number one skill sets that's required by a compliance officer is emotional intelligence. This is something that I have seen you proactively advocating for on your LinkedIn. You need to understand product knowledge, the regulations, regulatory knowledge you need in order to advise, but most importantly, emotional intelligence and being able to read a room and read the people that you are speaking to. You need to just kind of have a sense and feel for how things are going. I think a lot of people do not realize just how important it is. You can be the best in the world at your job, but if you do not have good EQ your promotional capabilities and your ability to transcend your career is limited. I know you do a lot of coaching as well, talking to people about the importance of emotional intelligence in the role. Can you talk about your experiences on the application of emotional intelligence in our day-to-day work?

Rashada Timkee:

That is where that frontline kind of retail experience is really fortified. It molded me as a professional. Having to engage and interact with our valued clients, as we would call them. Being able to kind of resolve issues for real people, day in and day out. I can say so much about EQ. I think it all boils down to the saying that my mother said, which is 'it's not what you say, it's how you say it'. I used to roll my eyes back in the day when she would say that, but it's so true. Emotionally intelligent compliance officers are the secret weapon because it is one thing to have the subject matter expertise but it's another thing entirely to be able to discern how to effectively communicate that to your stakeholders. There is a certain level of discernment required, as well as a level of awareness, and that's both self-awareness and the awareness of the bigger picture while you are communicating these necessary details. You must be able to distinguish between times when you should stand your ground and times when you should stand down. There is certainly a balance and a level of forethought required. I honestly cannot say enough about the importance of EQ. A lot of things, as you mentioned, within compliance are just not black and white. Whenever I would have my mentee's on the team, they would shoot me an instant message and give me an outline of what they were looking at and asked me a yes or no question and the answer is always, it depends because there's so much context that has to be taken into consideration. If you are an individual that see things in a black and white frame of thought, then I'm not sure if compliance is going to be for you.

Oonagh van den Berg:

It's important that we think outside the box, and we challenge ourselves. I do not want to get into gender bias here, but I remember when I was younger, somebody saying to me, 'Oonagh, you come across as emotional'. And I said, 'but I'm not emotional, I just kind of want to drive change', and I got the response, 'but if you were a man, you'd be seen as assertive'. I remember this gender inequality and thought, have I an inability to manage my emotional response to move things forward? When you're speaking, you're so calm and collected and clear. I really believe that is the way you are, but genuinely for myself it was something that took years to develop.

Rashada Timkee:

Yeah, I'm still working on that. I hesitate to say it sometimes.

Oonagh van den Berg:

When you talk about coaching and mentoring. I moved to Asia about 11 years ago and there was a real lack of mentoring available within the community. That is one reason we set up Raw Compliance. I didn't have a mentor for about a six- or seven-year period. If I do say so myself, I'm very good at what I do! But from a personal development and emotional intelligence perspective, I really believe that having a mentor is so important because they help you not just to reflect but also to potentially look at ways you can balance yourself. You sound incredibly calm and collected! Have you always been this way?

Rashada Timkee:

It came about organically. It's not something that I even realized that I needed. One of my first mentors actually was a colleague, who ended up becoming a leader within my group. I just was so drawn to her standard of excellence. There was certainly a likeness that I recognized in her and even more so something that I aspired to have myself. One thing about me is, when I'm impressed by someone, I have no problem saying that. It is no skin off of my back to be able to give someone their props. Being able to acknowledge that I was impressed by her knowledge base and her ability to effectively communicate that and just being open about what I did not know. That is what helps you forge that relationship, and she was able to share so many impactful lessons with me. Even when it came to how to draft an effective email, and be concise instead of rambling on and on. When your stakeholders are seniors, they do not really have time to get into the weeds, they just need the bottom line. Just things like that have giving me insight into these unspoken rules of engagement. And so definitely, this mentor has become a lifelong friend at this point. I think one other thing that I'm really interested in when it comes to mentors and mentee relationships is the opportunity for it to be a mutual exchange of value. Because I think that everyone has room to grow. I do not think that wisdom is solely given to those with a certain amount of tenure or a certain title, I think that everyone can provide value. I actually just recently posted about how much I love the idea of a reverse mentor. Because one thing that I fear is becoming stagnant or becoming complacent or feeling like there is nothing new for me to learn. I want to be a lifelong learner. I feel like the reversing mentor concept is one that is conducive to lifelong learning.

Oonagh van den Berg:

I totally agree with you. We recently set up a mentor-mentee program with Raw Compliance. And one of the things that I said from the outset, is that the mentor should be getting as much out of this as the mentees do because t is a two-way street. If any f us become complacen and we feel that we have nothin more to learn, I think it's very sad moment. Every singl day I'm learning. That's why I love compliance. I love the fact that you mentione the email. I am sure sometimes my colleagues sometimes wonder hy I do very short to the poi t one liners when somebody has s nt me like a very nicely crafted comprehensive email. I am so inc edibly conscious about the one of an email. You have to b so careful because an email can be read in any tone of voice and in any way. An mail should never be sent in h ste either. If something frust ates you write your email a d then go back and look at it an see whether you think it's orth sending. If you have to hink twice about sending i then don't bother. It is a l of these little things. These re things that we learned over he years. I've had mentors that ave taught early in my career to not respond to an email quic ly. Think about it and as w ll just don't go on and on. Peo le just need an answer. Front o fice they just want they want t know what they need to do and t ey just want to get on with it.

Rashada Timkee:

When you are going off into the weeds, you' e kind of making the assumpti n that that individual has no id a what they're doing but really hey just needed to clarify one d tail. There has to be a level f self-awareness even when you are responding in your email.

Oonagh van den Berg:

Absolutely. And one of the things I really loved as well, you drew attention to it on one of your LinkedIn posts which was niceness versus kindness. The number of times that we try our est to be nice, but then we ctually end up shooting urselves in the foot. I would lo e for you to talk a little bit about niceness versus kindness. y mother always said its impor nt to be kind, but sometimes y u need to communicate a message which isn't alway going to be nice. Being kind s about communicati g that message that sometimes p ople do not want to hear. When I saw your post kind it reson ted with me. Would you like o talk about niceness versus kindness?

Rashada Timkee:

I think that iceness, is kind of surface lev l. It's kind of like pleasantrie . It seems to me to align more ith etiquette. I think kindness s a more empathic kind o approach. I think that even when you are communicating ough information, just understan ing that person's point of vie , understanding where t eir headspace may be, and then acknowledging that as relevantly as you can. To me, the difference when it c mes to kindness is acknowledgin that you understand anothe point of view. Ther is a way when you are training where you can be n ce, but when your kind you're able to relate to those individu ls that you're onboarding. You an be transparent about it. Transparency is something t at I am a fan of. Whenever I t ain individuals and I'm giving them feedback, will be transparent with t em and say, 'I've learned his because I've made the sam mistake'. You need o be able to relate to people be ause you understand that there' a level of anxiety or there's level of self-consciousness an people are wanting do everythin right and not make a wrong mpression. Just having that base level understanding in y ur engagements, I feel s what distinguishes nicenes from kindness.

Oonagh van den Berg:

I completely agree with you. I also think you need to be true to yourself. One of the things that I've seen throughout nearly 20 years of my career. Wh n you try to be something ou're no, and you try to pret nd to be a person you're not, t does not work. There is only s long at that facade can stay u for. You really do need to ow your imperfections. This is som thing that kind of comes with age, we all need to embrace our mperfections. When we were you ger, we were taught never ta k about your weakness s because that's how someone c n hurt you. But as I've got o der, I've realized that we're going into an age now where emb acing your imperfections s as important as celebrating yo r strengths. I'm one of these p ople, if I don't know the answe to something, I will ask the q estion. Again, things that ou mother said! I think that's w at we could call this episode. y mother always said to me, if you have a question, neve be afraid to ask it because you can be guaranteed that there is 0 other people in the room that are thinking the same thing. T at's one thing that has alwa s held true. Never be shy to ex lore. Secondly, if you can't exp ain something in laymen te ms, if you can't explain w at you're doing to a four-year old, you don't understan it yourself. I have never be n afraid to put up my hand and s y, I don't understand. One of the things that I've been shock d about over the years is; a num er of people who know how to do something but they don't now why they do something. Wh have you never asked the why question? We do this a lot as well with junior people. Esp cially with younger com liance officers, we need to gi e them the psychological safety o ask the right questions.

Rashada Timkee:

I absolutely agree. You are speaking m language. You must cultivate a ulture that encourages people a d establishes a level of comfor when it comes to uncertainty. You do not want to have a ulture where people are n pins and needles and scared o be wrong because it just come with the territory. I do not ca e what industry you're in the e's going to be some level o clarification required and the ooner you can clarify something, the better. But unfort nately, if there is no psychol gical safety the team ill not feel comfortable r ising their hand, in order to obtain that clarification.

Oonagh van den Berg:

We a l need to have the ability a d the power to respect each of u individually, so that we c n speak up and say when we'r not comfortable with something. To be able to say I disagree o to give constructive feedback o colleagues, to team members even upwards where necessar . But the challenge between n ceness and kindness are e erybody wants to be nice because your KPIs are dependent on not just doing your job but making sure everyone's happy. I worry hat we are all too scared not t say the wrong thing for fear o impacting our own kind of onetary returns. That has a negative impact on culture. I' a massive advocate for psychol gical safety and the top 1% of companies in the world, what d fferent differentiates their s ccess is that psychol gical safety. Psychological saf ty is what drives innovation. ou need healthy conflict, he lthy challenge. Withi our traditional banking env ronment and this is across the b ard. We do not encourage that he lthy conflict. You can see the a gression and you see the p litics, but do we actually en ourage people to speak up? We ha a discussion last wee on a slightly separate is ue, on whistleblowing and th truth is if people had the psyc ological safety to be able to sp ak up in the good times and the bad, we wouldn't actually nee whistleblowers becau e of the issues would be known. The institution would be awar of them internally. Jus talking about cultural trans ormation, there is so much wor that we need to do as an indust y to get this right. We have go e from conduct and ethics an then we talked about conduct an culture, and now we are talk ng about ESG. We need to st p kind of talking about it nd starting to make instrumenta change. It is something that I am so incredibly passionate ab ut. Everything that you're sayin is part of that; em tional intelligence, havi g leaders like yoursel who step up and say; we nee to be kind, we don't necessaril need to be nice, we ne d to be honest, we need to b truthful, we need to be able o freely speak up. I have h gh hopes for you from an ind stry perspective. I see you as one of our future leaders, one f our CEOs in the industry. I do not say that lightly and by he way I don't say that to ev rybody. But the reason is b cause you encapsulate all the s rengths and the qualities tha we need within compliance. Not ust to be innovative, but to lso care because it is so import nt to show you care. And I supp sed that leads to the question where do you see yourself in t e next five years?

Rashada Timkee:

I definitely think that my idea of a five-year timeline was rocked by 2020. 2020, it really challenged me. The need to kind of put a stake in the ground when it comes to the possibilities right? How it can be disrupted so quickly. I'm just going to say that I see myself within compliance. Can't say exactly where but I absolutely I want to remain in compliance. Right now one of the major focuses is cultivating a culture of compliance. I think that is something that we've heard over and over and it has a nice ring to it, as anything with a hint of alliteration does. In order to achieve that grounding, an organization has to be in it for the long haul. They must be willing to undergo the transformation along with everything that comes with it and I want to be a part of that transformation. So that is where I see myself in the next five years. I see myself helping organizations push past the comfort zone of status quo practices and establishing the level of psychological safety that we talked about. One that is conducive to timely escalation and transparent communication and then breaking through this veil of solace that often accompanies silos. When I think of the solutions that are developed within silos, I know the intentions are good. But the problem often is that the solution is supported by uninformed intent. These are the types of things that I hope will evolve within the compliance space and I'm optimistic about it. I believe that creating a genuine culture of compliance is something that can happen in time with the proper levels of resolve and I am excited about not only witnessing but being a part of the concept and evolving beyond a catchy moto.

Oonagh van den Berg:

I totally agree with you, you could not have said it better. Culture is driven by behaviors, and behaviors are driven by values. People act in the way that incentivizes them based on their value systems. I think that's something that we seem to lose sight of across the industry. When we talk about culture, we need to understand value drivers. I really think that KPIs are our biggest negative in developing healthy culture, because that KPI incentivizes you to act by yourself. Depending on how they have been transformed into your kind of re incentivization scheme, but they're normally based on individual parameters of performance. If we talk about the team and we talk about the collective and we want to build a culture. People cannot continue to identify themselves kind of individually, because that kind of removes inclusion but it is important that we have diversity. We need people with different value drivers, we need people to challenge one another, to have healthy conflict. In order to get those all to work together, KPIs are just such a negative way of doing that, because some people are financially incentivized. Others are incentivized by being seen to be important, others incentivized by the title. I never realized until a couple of years ago, just how important titles are to people. It's something that's never been important to me. But I just am shocked by some people saying, 'I need to get this title by the end of the year.' It's never been about the money or the title. It has just been about doing the job that I love. The minute that I'm not loving it or I'm not enjoying it, then Ill move on to the next. Citi's an amazing organization and they're incredibly lucky to have you. I think Citi is an amazing place that you can grow in this type of environment. Their investing in conduct and making sure the culture is felt. Also being one of the first banks to have a female CEO is amazing as well. I think you are in a place right now, where female leadership is being embraced and culture is not just a discussion point. It is something that they're actively looking to transform, and I don't think that culture is bad at Citi compared to other institutions. I think it is a warm family place to work. I am so grateful to you for your time! Is there anything that we did not touch on that you would like to talk about?

Rashada Timkee:

The last thi g that I would say is that whe it comes to how I would desc ibe myself and this is something that I am recently coming i to. That they're kind of like t ree pillars and those are pproachability, collab ration and empowerment. I thin these are pillars are my ow value system. I want to be abl to be approachable. I want my eam to feel comfortable asking uestions or clarify misunders andings. I am all about pulling resources and giving credit where credit is due. I am obviously a major fan of aut nomy and empowering developing thers. When I think abou what will ground me as compliance professional, it wo ld be those three things.

Oonagh van den Berg:

I love that I did a female executiv woman leadership course a Yale last year. The focus wa on values, networking and inno ation. The three kind of key w rds were exactly like you said mpowerment, approachability and ollaboration. If you can make hose work together and have emp thy for others and letting peopl have autonomy. Being abl to step back and let people ake mistakes because people nee to make mistakes to learn. I am definitely not a micromanage . I like to step back. I th nk that if people aren't fac litated to make mistakes and be llowed to make mistakes, t ey don't learn from it. I like t kind of share wisdom and say, Well, I've made these mista es in my career,' but sometimes ou just must make the mistake for yourself, to learn the les on. I think that it's really i portant. Leadership is taking ff the cotton wool. When a chil is learning to walk, they must learn to fall, they have to lear that they can't keep hittin the floor. We definitely need t be supportive, as leaders, b t we also need to allow people the psychological safety o make a mistake. Also, the fa t that mistakes aren't bad, m stakes will happen but it's ho we learn from them and grow f om them. As Einstein said, 'I you keep doing the same thin over and over again, expecting different results, it's nsanity.' You need people t learn because that is where nnovation starts. So, I'm total y with you. Rashada, coming cross your profile on Linked n obviously wasn't by chance. I m a big believer in fate, I am a believer in everythin happens for a reason. This s not going to be the first or last time that we speak. I wi l continue to watch your post on LinkedIn and I'm so honore to have had the opportunity o speak with you today. ith no pressure I have incredib y high hopes for you as one of o r future leaders in this ind stry. Please keep up the good work, keep doing what you're doing. It would be wonderful t welcome you to one of our webi ars in the coming months to s are some of your wisdom as wel . It is easy for people to t lk about these things, but you' e living and breathing it. A d that is the difference. We need also to show people that hey can step out and do wh t they say. And that there is positivity on the back of th t.

Rashada Timkee:

Yes Oonagh! I cannot thank you enough, just for even thinking of me. I too have been observing all the am zing and incredible progress that you have made with RAW Compliance since its inceptio . It is just incredible! Like yo said its fate to be able to c eate a platform like you have it's just amazing. I'm honored and I look forward to our furt er collaboration. Thank you s much!

Oonagh van den Berg:

My pleasure. Have a wonderful day. All the best. Bye!

Intro
Rashada's Career
How Rashada Got Into Sanctions
Sanctions
Regulatory Compliance
Emotional Intelligence Of A Compliance Officer
Mentors & Mentees
Kindness Vs Niceness
Where Does Rashada She Herself In The Next Five Years?
Compliance Culture
Approachability, Collaboration and Empowerment
Outro